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Award-Winning Safety Culture

DesCor Builders has just accomplished the extraordinary by earning the SHARP Award from Cal-OSHA. The SHARP (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program) Award honors high-hazard employers for…

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Flatstick Pub touts more than golf and beer downtown

Days ahead of Flatstick Pub’s grand opening in downtown Sacramento, co-owner Brandon Robinson said he’s excited to show it off.The 14,000-square-foot space on two levels in the…

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DesCor Awarded Best Places to Work 2019

Taking care of people means making them feel comfortable and valued.Sacramento Business Journal, October 11, 2019A+ Employers Award / Best Places to WorkMedium Company Winner 2019: DesCor Builders…

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Best Real Estate Projects of the Year.

This is the top medical project.Sutter Health’s SeniorCare Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) has operated in Sacramento County in some fashion for roughly 27 years. It opened…

/// READ MORE ///

Construction picking up at 156-unit Stonebrier Apartments

STOCKTON — Crews have started work on a new apartment complex near the corner of Bianchi Road and West Lane in Stockton.The three-story complex of 156 one- and two-bedroom apartments is the 13th…

/// READ MORE ///

DesCor receives CAL-OSHA SHARPS certification

It's official! DesCor received SHARPS recognition from CAL OSHA. This is the highest safety recognition that is given. It took over a year of effective planning, coordination and perseverance to make…

/// READ MORE ///

Sakata Seed America Opens $18.5 Million Woodland Innovation Center

Not too long ago, when Sakata Seed America was looking to relocate some of its operations from Morgan Hill, there was an easy choice near Woodland.Land values in Morgan Hill, a pricey suburb roughly…

/// READ MORE ///

Wiseman’s third Napa office building wins Top Real Estate Projects in North Bay for 2018

The 1300 Main project is a three-story, 21,000- square-foot, mixed-use class A office and retail building located in downtown Napa.With its central location, ground floor restaurant, the building’s…

/// READ MORE ///

Interested in working on a project with DesCor? Have a question? We’d love to hear from you!

Award-Winning Safety Culture

DesCor Builders has just accomplished the extraordinary by earning the SHARP Award from Cal-OSHA. The SHARP (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program) Award honors high-hazard employers for their excellence in safety practices. Currently, DesCor is the only general contractor in Northern California approved and listed as a SHARP participant. DesCor’s recognized project is The Pique, a 327-unit apartment complex under construction in Folsom.

Founded in 2005, DesCor provides full-service preconstruction, general contracting, and construction management services throughout Northern California. This licensed general contractor provides sophisticated services at a competitive cost, and has a robust culture of safety. Backed by this philosophy, Robert Harding, regional safety director, initiated pursuit of the SHARP Award in April 2018.

“We are committed to people first, so we make safety our number-one priority and receiving the SHARP Award exemplifies that commitment.”

– Brad Des Jardin, president & ceo

“Many general contractors won’t pursue the SHARP Award because it takes a considerable amount of effort and coordination,” notes Harding. “All of our subcontractors have to commit to this, and agree to in-depth analysis by Cal-OSHA. I work with all our subs to assess their entire safety programs and help them become compliant. For those without safety director, we take that role for them, helping them elevate their safety culture and training.”

DesCor delivers its building strategy on a foundation of safety. “Safety is our established policy before we break ground on any project,” says Jeff Deming, senior superintendent. “Large corporate clients have had third-party consultants and safety management companies review our program, and we always meet or exceed their requirements. Pursuing the SHARP Award is putting our program to the test in the field.”

With the commitment of time, effort, and strong partnerships with subcontractors required to earn the SHARP Award, it’s clear that DesCor takes a true team approach and that safety is always a primary concern. “We really do care about people – our team, those working on our projects, and our clients,” concludes Neal Cordeiro, vice president and CFO.

Link to article: Award-Winning Safety Culture
Jennifer von Geldern, Freelance Writer | Comstock’s Magazine
Charles Vincent McDonald, Freelance Photographer | Comstock’s Magazine
Comstock’s Magazine: August 2019

Interested in working on a project with DesCor? Have a question? We’d love to hear from you!

Flatstick Pub touts more than golf and beer downtown

Days ahead of Flatstick Pub’s grand opening in downtown Sacramento, co-owner Brandon Robinson said he’s excited to show it off.

The 14,000-square-foot space on two levels in the basement of 630 K St. might be best known as a combination miniature golf course and beer bar. But Robinson, who owns the site with his wife, Sacramento native Jennifer Robinson, said he’s pushing back on those who dismiss it as “Fratstick Pub,” a gathering spot for bro types.

Flatstick pub

“It’s not a sports bar,” he said, though there are plenty of high-definition TVs showing sports. “If you don’t like the beer, come for the art. If you don’t like the art, come for the golf. If you don’t like the golf, come for the food. It’s all about having a lot of options.”

In what was the tasting room for craft brewery Ruhstaller before the latter moved to nearby 726 K St., Flatstick Pub was a $3 million investment. The business is scheduled to open Sunday.

From three holes spelling out the letters “SAC” in the nine-hole mini-golf course to 42 taps featuring breweries from within 100 miles, Brandon Robinson said, there is a strong emphasis on the local. In that same vein, the pub’s food service, #taco, uses farm-to-fork ingredients, while party and event rooms as well as a golf course sculpture of the Tower Bridge feature local artists such as Maren Conrad and Gina Rossi.

Mini golf won’t be the only diversion at Flatstick, which is based on a concept from Seattle. An idea conceived there will have what Robinson said is its only presence in Northern California: duffleboard, a bar game combining shuffleboard and golf, with nine different “holes.”

Another area of Flatstick will feature other golf-based pub games, while event rooms line the walls.

Flatstick will also offer something a bit more upscale, though at a price.

From the K Street entrance, it’s easy to miss at first. But behind a trophy case, the Trophy Club is a speakeasy with craft cocktails by experienced bartenders and custom furniture and interior design by Sacramento architect Brendan Koon of Vitae Architecture.

Annual fees for the Trophy Club will be $400, Robinson said, though that comes with perks such as unlimited golf and games at Flatstick. “We wanted a place that was vibrant and fun,” he said, adding membership will be capped, and a handful of Sacramento Kings players and coaches are signed up, among others.

Flatstick Pub’s Sacramento location is the first in California, Robinson said, but it won’t be the last. He’s hoping to eventually have other locations in the Bay Area and elsewhere.

Link to Article: Flatstick pub touts more than golf and beer
Ben van der Meer | Staff Writer | Sacramento Business Journal
Oct 15, 2019

Interested in working on a project with DesCor? Have a question? We’d love to hear from you!

DesCor Awarded Best Places to Work 2019

Taking care of people means making them feel comfortable and valued.

Sacramento Business Journal, October 11, 2019
A+ Employers Award / Best Places to Work
Medium Company Winner 2019: DesCor Builders

The co-founders of DesCor Builders have done more than grow their business by the numbers.

Brad Des Jardin and Neal Cordeiro say they have created a family.

In 2005, the Rancho Cordova-based company began with four employees, now it has 74.

“We have a philosophy, if you do the right things and take care of people, the money will come,” Des Jardin said.

And it has.

Revenues are trending at about $150 million this year, up from $113 million in 2018, he said.

Taking care of people means making them feel comfortable and valued.

“For a person who has been here less than four years to be able to have the opportunity to have a seat at that table and have a voice that is heard is so foreign to me, but that’s DesCor in a nutshell. They empower people.”

– Sean Sargenti, project superintendent

Des Jardin and Cordeiro don’t have corner offices. Instead, they work at desks in an open office space so team members can come to them anytime for advice or to share ideas.

Employees also participate in planning sessions, including ones that will determine the company’s 2030 goals.

“For a person who has been here less than four years to be able to have the opportunity to have a seat at that table and have a voice that is heard is so foreign to me, but that’s DesCor in a nutshell,” said Sean Sargenti, a project superintendent. “They empower people.”

Des Jardin and Cordeiro also make sure they know their people.

“I got a call last week from Neal just to check in,” said Lee Freeman, a project superintendent. Cordeiro wasn’t asking about a project. He was calling to see how Lee’s son Chase was doing. Did the Whitney High School senior like working for DesCor with his dad during the summer? Does he still plan to attend Sac State?

“They always remember your wife’s name, your kid’s name. It’s about you, so that makes you feel like you’re a big family,” Freeman said.

Spouses and children come to barbecues and celebrations; spouses attend the annual fundraisers for Sierra Forever Families.

To work for DesCor, people have to fit into the family-first culture. Often hires come through word-of-mouth recruiting.

For instance, when Des Jardin spotted Joe Giger skiing with DesCor employees, he interviewed him on the chairlift as they rode to the top of the mountain. Giger had a second interview and signed on.

A project manager, Giger appreciates the company’s work-life balance philosophy.

“We are all home at 5 p.m. to spend time with our family. That’s important because a lot of our competitors are conducting business in the Bay Area,” Giger said. “They aren’t home until 7 p.m.”

Before joining DesCor, Sargenti and his wife wanted to have a second child, but he worked out of town all week and sometimes on Saturdays, so that wasn’t practical.

“I can safely say that the focus that DesCor puts on work-life balance and family first is the whole reason I have a 10-month-old,” Sargenti said of his second child.

Seeing all the children at a company picnic makes Des Jardin proud.

“It’s like a sign of prosperity when people feel good enough that they are buying homes and having kids,” he said. “We feel like the DesCor family has just expanded, and we love that.”

Bonnie Stewart | Correspondent | Sacramento Business Journal
October 14, 2019

Interested in working on a project with DesCor? Have a question? We’d love to hear from you!

Best Real Estate Projects of the Year.

This is the top medical project.

Sutter Health’s SeniorCare Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) has operated in Sacramento County in some fashion for roughly 27 years. It opened a small center in 1992 on Franklin Boulevard, and in 1995, a second outpost on U Street, said Karli Holkko, interim administrative director of Sutter’s PACE. But as the centers became a prominent model for elderly care, they couldn’t accommodate the growing number of seniors who wanted to use the space.

“Those buildings were really well loved, and while we were growing the program, we eventually reached capacity,” Holkko said. That’s when Sutter made the decision to invest in building a new center — a one-stop shop for all of its participants’ health care and personal needs — at another location. After completing the new center in July 2018, Sutter has since closed its previous locations and now operates solely out of its River District facility, “which is more spacious than the previous two centers combined,” Holkko added.

An aerial view of the Sutter SeniorCare PACE Center.
COURTESY OF TODD QUAM | DIGITAL SKY AERIAL IMAGING

The idea for bringing the two facilities under one roof stemmed from Sutter’s need to “update materially, but also to improve the workflow,” said Stephanie Swain, director of interior design at Dreyfuss + Blackford Architecture, which worked on the project. Identifying a location that would be transit-friendly, cost-effective and able to streamline patient and administrative services were at the forefront of Sutter’s considerations.

Early on in the planning process, Swain said that her firm conducted a validation study to potentially build a ground-up facility, “but I don’t think it penciled out with the whole budget,” she said. Because of the community Sutter serves in its PACE program, “the location had to be perfect,” she added. “And that’s how they arrived at Richards Boulevard, a location that’s at the height of redevelopment.”

Formerly office space built in the 1970s, the property consisted of four gutted, single-story concrete buildings, Swain said. The development team renovated and updated three buildings on the property, all connected by a breezeway structure, as well as exterior courtyards that brought in a lot of natural light into the space, Swain said.

Now, the three-building, 45,000-square-foot complex houses all of the program’s offerings. That includes clinic space, the Adult Day Health Care (ADHD) — “where we feed them, entertain them and educate them” — along with a separate building for administrative staff, said Dana LeSher, senior project manager at Sutter Health. The center also includes private therapy rooms, an expanded library, a full-service kitchen and on-site laundry facilities.

“The breezeways that existed in the common areas between the three buildings were cleared up and we added wood privacy screens and gates to compartmentalize the areas for physical therapy,” said Andy Laughton, project manager at DesCor Builders. He added that workers also installed steps and walking areas with AstroTurf and handrails so that participants can go outside and navigate different terrain, or take advantage of other outdoor areas for activities like tai chi and yoga. “Before, it was just dated pavers and concrete planters that had been neglected, and we turned it into a pedestrian egress area and path of travel that they could actually use.”

While multiple parties were involved in the planning and redevelopment process, Sutter used a method of construction called the Last Planner System. The scheduling and management style aims to streamline communication. For example, the project’s foreman was brought into meetings to help make decisions that the team would review and ratify, LeSher said.

“It’s an integrated method with our contractors meeting once a week, breaking areas into five groups to expedite construction,” Laughton added. “We also worked closely with Sutter’s equipment vendors throughout the move-in and were very involved in project conception, which included design build all the way through to finish and equipment.”

LeSher added this was the first time that Sutter used the planning and management style for a medium-sized project, which helped the team finish the new center on deadline.

In selecting materials for interior spaces, Sutter did so with its participants in mind, said Swain. “We were trying to make sure that the participants would feel like the space is an extension of their homes,” she said. Using the nearby river as inspiration, designers used softer hues and textures that mimicked the water and natural stone.

As the designers and contractors all worked together, they also consulted with the program participants to help select artwork for the facility. “They actually had some major input as to what they wanted,” LeSher said. “You tend to see a lot of photos and artwork from their era.”

Sutter’s PACE program currently serves all of Sacramento County and has added 80 new participants since opening its doors last December, said Holkko, who added that Sutter’s vision is to further grow the program, including a joint venture with WelbeHealth, which manages medical and social services for seniors and recently opened a center in Stockton.

“Because of what they offer here, and all of the services are under one roof … this concept is really taking off,” Swain added. “They’ve done such a phenomenal job at getting this past just the basics and extending the livelihood of these patients,” Swain said. “We need more of this.”

***

Size: 45,000 square feet
Cost: $11.2 million
Completed: July 2018
Developer: Sutter Health
General Contractor: DesCor Builders
Architect: Dreyfuss + Blackford

Link to Article: Best real estate projects sutter seniorcare pace
By Nathan Falstreau | Correspondent | Sacramento Business Journal
Sep 20, 2019

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Construction picking up at 156-unit Stonebrier Apartments

STOCKTON — Crews have started work on a new apartment complex near the corner of Bianchi Road and West Lane in Stockton.

The three-story complex of 156 one- and two-bedroom apartments is the 13th project in the portfolio of the Patmon Company, a family-owned construction and property management business since 1965 in Stockton. Patmon Co. and Grupe Commercial have joined forces to build the project, called Stonebrier Apartments, and have contracted architects Mark Lee of Lee-Jagoe Architecture in Stockton and landscape architect Jeffrey Gamboni of Stockton. Construction will be performed by DesCor Builders of Rancho Cordova and the complex is scheduled to be completed next year.

Stonebrier is directly south of office and retail space built by Patmon Co. that includes The Kitchen Restaurant and soon will be home to the company’s corporate offices. Residents of Stonebrier will have valet service to receive packages and dry cleaning, as well as private garages and covered parking. The project will cost approximately $36 million and monthly rent for a one-bedroom unit will be about $1,400. Patmon Co. builds, owns and manages its apartments.

“I haven’t sold a building in 40 years,” said Charles “Pat” Patmon III, president of Patmon Co. “We have the largest portfolio of apartments under ownership in Stockton,” with 1,867 total units.”

Stonebrier is preceded by Ashley Park on Pershing Avenue, Sorrento on Rosemarie Lane, Abbey Pointe on Tyrol Lane, and Torcello at Bianchi Road and West Lane. Patmon Co. also has built and owns Iron Horse and Country Club Village on Country Club Boulevard, Parkside on Blue Ridge Circle, Schooner Landing on Shoreline Drive, Harbor Isle on Mariners Drive, Quailwood on Grouse Run Drive, Westpointe on West Lane and Bridle Path Place on Bridle Path Way.

Construction all but stopped during the recession. During that time, Patmon pulled equity from existing properties and refinanced them. Now, the company is building again.

“It’s a good thing,” Patmon said. “I think it’s because people are working. People have jobs.”

Construction activity has increased, and so have costs. In 2003, Patmon built Torcello for $25 million or $83,000 per apartment. The cost per unit at Stonebrier will be $232,000, a 277 percent increase from Torcello.

In the works for Patmon Co. are another $200 million in projects in Stockton, including developments at Eight Mile and Thornton roads and Trinity Parkway

Link to article: Construction picking up at 156-unit stonebrier apartments
Bob Highfill, Staff Writer | Recordnet.com
July 23, 2019

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DesCor receives CAL-OSHA SHARPS certification

It’s official! DesCor received SHARPS recognition from CAL OSHA. This is the highest safety recognition that is given. It took over a year of effective planning, coordination and perseverance to make happen. This achievement is the result of a company-wide effort from the office to the field. DesCor is currently one of the few contractors that have received this recognition in the past ten years, and is currently the only SHARPS general contractor in Northern California. A special thanks to the entire team at The Pique at Iron Pointe; their partnership with Cal-OSHA and participation in the program was key in DesCor obtaining the certification. Thank you to our entire DesCor Team. Without the people that we have, and the culture that we have created, we wouldn’t be one of the best Safety Programs in the industry. Great Job DesCor!

Robert Harding, Regional Safety Coordinator
DesCor Builders | June 2018

California’s SHARP is designed to meet the Federal OSHA requirements for a Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). Cal/SHARP employer worksites are recognized as worksites expected to have a significantly lower risk for serious accidents than other employer’s worksites within the same industry. Cal/SHARP applicants must be able to demonstrate active management commitment and employee involvement in their safety and health management system, as well as their ability to meet applicable dual- and multi-employer responsibilities. The company must also demonstrate that their safety and health management systems are effective in preventing and reducing accidents at the worksite. Read More: https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/cal_vpp/eagle.html

Interested in working on a project with DesCor? Have a question? We’d love to hear from you!

Sakata Seed America Opens $18.5 Million Woodland Innovation Center

Not too long ago, when Sakata Seed America was looking to relocate some of its operations from Morgan Hill, there was an easy choice near Woodland.

Land values in Morgan Hill, a pricey suburb roughly 15 minutes south of San Jose, were two to three times what they were in Yolo County, where Sakata ultimately decided to build its $18.5 million, 215-acre Woodland Innovation Center. Sakata, which had run smaller research operations in Woodland in the past, would have a larger center to recruit students from UC Davis — one of the world’s best agricultural schools. And Sakata could take greater advantage of one of the Capital Region’s secrets: It has some of the best land in the world to grow seed.

It was certainly no secret to Tim Do-Cambridge, project manager for Sakata’s Woodland Innovation Center (not to be confused with the Woodland Research & Technology Park, also in the works), which opened in September. Asked if the area’s fertile land encouraged Sakata to build its center there — where the company will research, produce and package seeds — Do-Cambridge replied, “Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. Our land, the land that we purchased… really helps to support our research and production.”

While Sakata might not have the name recognition of a Monsanto, the company has made its own mark. Do-Cambridge says 70 percent of broccoli on the West Coast comes from Sakata seeds. The company’s roots in Japan, where it is currently headquartered in Yokohama, go back more than a century. In Woodland, Do-Cambridge says, the company will have peppers and melons as its two main seed crops to take advantage of the area’s climate.

A number of major agricultural companies already operate in the Sacramento region, which include Monsanto in Roseville, Bayer in West Sacramento and Syngenta in Woodland. The region produces seeds at a prodigious rate, with Kent Bradford, director of UC Davis’s Seed Biotechnology Center, noting for example that the Sacramento Valley produces a quarter of all the sunflower seeds for the world. “It’s one of the best places to grow seed in the world,” Bradford says.

‘Beneficial Uses’ for Yolo County

Stephanie Cormier, Yolo County’s assigned planner on the project, says the new center met with little resistance. “When a project like this comes, even though it’s a discretionary project and requires an entitlement process that can be very lengthy and cumbersome and costly, we typically don’t get a lot of opponents or opposition,” Cormier says. “These are seen as very beneficial uses to the county.”

Still, there were a few speed bumps. Initially, Sakata Seed wanted to use all of the 215 acres it purchased for agriculture and locate a hub of six buildings amid a grove of oak trees that the county considers a special resource.

Though the applicants worked out a plan that would have preserved all the living trees, the county called for a full environmental impact report in exchange for locating there. Cormier says Sakata decided it wasn’t worth going through an EIR — the most time-consuming type of environmental review in California — and opted to place the buildings elsewhere on approximately 15 acres of its land.

Stantec designed the center. DesCor Builders was the general contractor for the project, which was completed in about two years. “They felt like they needed to reach out and go somewhere where the land value was more in line with the type of work they did,” says Matt Shigihara, a project principal for Stantec, of Sakata’s decision to relocate to Yolo County. There were also some issues, Shigihara says, associated with building in a remote, unincorporated part of the county, roughly five miles from Woodland city limits.

“When you’re building that many buildings out in the middle of land that’s not developed, it’s like building a mini-city,” Shigihara says. “You’re providing power out there. You’re providing basically a septic system to accept the sewer. You’re drilling a well. You’re providing fire protection, all of these things that (are) required by code these days. But you’re doing it all from scratch, so planning for that was really an interesting part of the process.”

Strengthening Ties with UC Davis

With the Woodland Innovation Center, Sakata Seed will have the opportunity to strengthen its existing ties to UC Davis, which is a common attraction for agricultural companies locating in Yolo County, says Cormier.

It’s simple to see why this occurs. Bradford — who is also a UC Davis professor of plant science and interim director of the school’s World Food Center — says UC Davis is ranked either No. 1 or No. 2 in the world, along with Wageningen University in the Netherlands and Cornell University, for agriculture and natural resources. UC Davis is also arguably top three specifically for seeds, Bradford adds, along with Wageningen — the Netherlands has the biggest seed trade in the world aside from the US — and Iowa State, which focuses on corn and soy.

Industry executives like Gabe Patin, former head of Sakata Seed America, saw the value in UC Davis. After Bradford approached the Seed Advisory Board that Patin sat on to pitch creating the school’s Seed Biotechnology Center, Patin says he convinced the then-chairman of Sakata’s parent company to contribute $100,000 to the effort. He also raised an additional $175,000 among other board members. Patin was eager to gather research pushing back on popular public sentiment against GMOs, and he respected the research capabilities of the center.

“They do a lot of research from various points of view,” says Patin, now 89. “They’re scientific people. These guys are all Ph.D.s — I’m not.”

The center will celebrate its 20th anniversary next year. A university spokesperson noted after Patin won an Award of Distinction from the school in 2017 that he considers his role in helping to create the center “one of the greatest accomplishments of his life.”

The school hosts networking sessions for students and ag companies the second Thursday of every month during the school year. In time, perhaps a robust stream of UC Davis students and graduates could be heading to intern and work at the Woodland Innovation Center.

Bradford, who attended the center’s grand opening in September, anticipates expansion, based on the set-up of buildings. “They’ve got their processing facility, they’ve got their breeding facility, the place for their tractors and all that and there’s gaps in between it,” he says. “You can see that they’re planning to expand and be there for the long term, so that’s going to be a really nice facility.”

Link to article: Sakata Seed America Opens $18.5 Million Woodland Innovation Center
Graham Womack | Comstock’s Magazine
December 21, 2018

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Wiseman’s third Napa office building wins Top Real Estate Projects in North Bay for 2018

The 1300 Main project is a three-story, 21,000- square-foot, mixed-use class A office and retail building located in downtown Napa.

With its central location, ground floor restaurant, the building’s architecture is simple but elegant. Materials, massing and the arrangement of windows are drawn from downtown Napa’s architectural heritage, including the vintner’s narrow windows with distinct vertical orientation.

The third floor is set back to reinforce the transition to the future lower development to the north. Broad horizontal openings at the street level provide a venue for a strong inside-outside restaurant experience.

Inside includes energy-efficient amenities, such as dual-pane windows, fully automated lighting and fixture sensors, and a direct digital remote controlled climate control system.

Office tenants in the building include Wilson Daniels, marketing distinctive wines and spirits; Home Street Bank; Edward Jones Investments, and the Whole Health Institute. Retail tenants include Mario Bazan Cellar’s wine-tasting room, and Hal Yamashita Napa, the first in the United States and 10th restaurant of celebrity chef Haruyuki Yamashita with restaurants in Japan cities of Kobe, Osaka, Tokyo and in other countries.

Link to article: 1300 Main Napa wins Top Real Estate Projects
Gary Quackenbush | for North Bay Business Journal
December 11, 2018

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